Finding Perspective In These Difficult Times

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The Corona Virus has brought the world to a virtual standstill. The things that people once enjoyed doing and the places they loved to travel has all come to an abrupt halt. The virus has affected the lifestyle of every individual and family. It’s a mess out there now. It can sometimes be hard to discern between what’s a real threat and what is just simple panic and hysteria.

Consider this; did any of us think, just a few short months ago, that we would all be required to wear masks, keep a six-foot distance between each other, be told not to touch, shake hands, or even hug each other for fear of spreading this dastardly virus? Did you ever fathom the thought that businesses, gyms, theaters, salons, eateries, and other establishments would be closed and millions upon millions would be out of work? And who ever heard of the term, “social distancing?”

The current environment has also affected people psychologically in various ways Some people have used the time of quarantine in positive ways: spending more quality with their families, spending more time in prayer and Scripture reading, enjoying the quietness of life. Unfortunately, this time has had the opposite effect on individuals: rise in depression, abuse and other negative effects. A current study showed that nearly half (45%) of adults in the United States reported that their mental health has been negatively impacted due to worry and stress over the virus.

Let’s put this whole period of time into perspective. So far, this pandemic has only been with us for about three months and, for some people, it seems like a lifetime. But let’s take a moment and put this into perspective.

Imagine for a moment, that you were born in the year 1900. (right around the time period that your grand, great-grand parents were born).

On your 14th birthday, World War I begins, then ends on your 18th birthday four years later. 22 million people perish in that war.

Later in the year, a Spanish Flu epidemic hits the planet and runs until your 20th birthday. 50 million people die from it during those two years with 500 million people infected.

Yes, 50 million perished!

On your 29th birthday, the Great Depression begins. Unemployment hits 25%, the World GDP drops 27%. That runs until you are 33.

The country nearly collapses along with the world economy.

When you turn 39, World War II starts, and you aren’t even over the hill yet!

On your 41st birthday, the United States is fully pulled into WWII.

Between your 39th and 45th birthday, 75 million people perish in the war.

At 50, the Korean War starts. 5 million perish. At 55 the Vietnam War begins and doesn’t end for 20 years. 4 million people perish in that conflict.

On your 62nd birthday you have the Cuban Missile Crisis, a tipping point in the Cold War. Life on our planet, as we know it, should have ended. Great leaders prevented that from happening.

When you turn 75, the Vietnam War finally ends.

Think of everyone on the planet born in 1900. How did they survive all of that?

Think about all of those things that you would have experienced in your lifetime. When your grandparents speak about, “when times were hard,” now you have an idea what life was like from their perspective!

Yet they survived through everything listed above.

What we are experiencing right now has been for a FEW MONTHS.

Perspective is an amazing art. We become refined, wiser, and more enlightened as time marches on. Let’s try and keep things in perspective and remember, the God, the maker of the heavens and the earth knows exactly what is going on in the world around us. We don’t need to fear the unknown for He will take care of us. He will keep us safe, free from harm, and watch over us every day!

“The Lord will keep you from all harm. He will watch over your life; the Lord will watch over your coming and going both now and forevermore.” ~ Psalm 212:7-8

10 Comments

  1. Yes, we can put it into perspective as far as the length of time is concerned. I was born in the late 1920s,and lived through all of what happened from then on, but we never had to stay at home or wear masks or keep our distance from others, or not be able to visit our families. This virus is taking its mental toll on people far more than it did during World War ll. Most of the population will survive it. My hope is that we will emerge as a kinder, more thoughtful population. Certainly, it has brought out the best in many in their care about others. A friend of mine, who is a nurse on the front line in a hospital,contacted the virus and was very ill, but recovered. She was right back to work the moment she was able. Neighbors have extended offers to help people with rides or delivering groceries. Nature has a lesson to teach us. my prayer is that we are listening and learning.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. We will definitely survive this, and what a perspective. I agree with the comment above. I think that the social distancing is key in how everybody is feeling. We deal with issues by nurturing each other, and the closer the better. Social distancing has prevented this, but people have found so many creative ways to support each other.

    Liked by 2 people

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