The NILE Virus (Type C)

There is a new Mutant Strain appearing across most countries. I thought you would want to know about this virus.

Photo Credit: Gratisography via Pexels

Even the most advanced computer programs from Norton, McAfee, and others cannot take care of this one. It appears to target those who were born prior to 1960. The sporadic lock down seems to be increasing the chances of being affected!

Virus Symptoms:

1. Causes you to send the same e-mail twice. (Done that)

2. Causes you to send a blank e-mail. (That too)

3. Causes you to send an e-mail to the wrong person. (Yup)

4. Causes you to send it back to the person who sent it to you. (That too)

5. Causes you to forget to attach the attachment. (Done that)

6. Causes you to hit SEND before you’ve finished. (Oh no, not again)

7. Causes you to hit DELETE instead of SEND. (Hate that)

8. Causes you to hit SEND when you should DELETE. (Heck, now what?)

This virus is called the C-NILE  virus! 

A lot of us have already been inflicted with this disease and unfortunately as we age, it gets worse. And if you can’t admit to doing any of the above, you’ve obviously caught the other strain – the D-NILE virus. Doctors say that lots of naps and a daily dose of Johnnie Walker liquid medicine might help.

I hope you enjoyed te giggles and smile!

The Four Candles – A Story of Peace in Troubled Times

Photo by Myriam Zilles on Unsplash

If you’ve ever felt despair, suffered tragedy or generally gone through the harshness of life, this is a wonderful story that will lift your spirits…

The Four Candles burned slowly. Their Ambiance was so soft you could hear them speak…

The First Candle said, “I Am Peace, but these days, nobody wants to keep me lit.”

Then Peace’s flame slowly diminishes and goes out completely.

The Second Candle said, “I Am Faith, but these days, I am no longer indispensable.”

Then Faith’s flame slowly diminishes and goes out completely.

Sadly, The Third Candle Speaks, “I Am Love and I haven’t the strength to stay lit any longer.

People put me aside and don’t understand my importance. They even forget to love those who are nearest to them.” Waiting no longer, Love goes out completely.

Suddenly…A child enters the room and sees the three candles no longer burning. The child begins to cry, “Why are you not burning? You are supposed to stay lit until the end!”

Then the Fourth Candle speaks gently to the little child, “Don’t be afraid, for I Am Hope, and while I still burn, we can re-light the other candles.”

With Shining Eyes, the child took the Candle Of Hope and lit the other three candles.

Never let the Flame of Hope go out of your life. With Hope, no matter how bad things look and are…Peace, Faith and Love can Shine Brightly in our lives.

~ Author Unknown

The Lesson of the Raven and the Eagle

Photo Credit: Digital Grin Photography Forum

Have you ever let the “little things” in your life get you down, made you mad, or take the joy out of your life? If so, then today’s little story is just or you!!

The only bird that dares to peck and irritate an eagle is the raven. It will sit on the eagle’s back and start to continually bite its neck. However, the eagle does not respond, nor does it fight with the raven. It does not spend its time and energy on the raven…it just opens its wings and begins to fly and rise higher and higher into the heavens. The higher the eagle flies, the harder it is for the raven to breathe and soon, the raven falls off due to the lack of oxygen.

Stop wasting your time with the “ravens.” Just take them to your heights and they will fade away.

The enemy will sit behind your back and bite your neck, but those who wait upon the Lord will have new strength; they will lift their wings like eagles. (Isaiah 40:31)

Be strong and Courageous!

Quarantine Smiles

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Photo Credit: Etty Fidele via Unsplash

As the worldwide quarantine continues, so does the boredom and monotony of staying indoors and being confined in limited areas.

Well, good news!! It’s time for a good giggle, smile, or laugh! The following pictures / quotes are a collection of humorous images that I accumulated from around the web and friends of mine.

It is my hope that the following photos will bring a smile to your face and a song to your heart.

Enjoy!

Batman After QBush MaskAliensClosedAirlineButtonsDog LoungingFluffyFloor MatEasterFarmersGrandpa WindowKnock KnockLoch NessLogScaleRacecarQuarantine day 11OlderMissing 2020Social Distancing Choice

Robin Williams

Robin Williams

Safe SaxTP RollWeddingsToiletTired Dog

Quarantine Reflections

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We all know how much impact the quarantine and all the time that we have spent “locked down” has had on us. Days seem to melt together, and, on occasions, time just seems to slow down.

I came across the following thoughts from a friend of mine. Some of them are funny and some will make you sit back and think. Whatever the case…enjoy.

***************

I hope they give us two weeks’ notice before sending us back out into the real world.  I think we’ll all need the time to become ourselves again.  And by “ourselves” I mean lose 10 pounds, cut our hair and get used to not drinking at 9:00 a.m.

New monthly budget:  Gas: $0, Entertainment: $0, Clothes: $0, Groceries: $2,799.

Breaking News:  Wearing a mask inside your home is now highly recommended.  Not so much to stop COVID-19, but to stop eating.
Low maintenance chicks are having their moment right now.  We don’t have nails to fill and paint, roots to dye, eyelashes to re-mink, and are thrilled not to have to get dressed every day.  I have been training for this moment my entire life!

When this quarantine is over, let’s not tell some people.

I stepped on my scale this morning.  It said: “Please practice social distancing. Only one person at a time on scale.”

Not to brag, but I haven’t been late to anything in over 6 weeks.

It may take a village to raise a child but I swear it is going to take a vineyard to home school one.

I wanted zombies and anarchy.  Instead we got working from home and toilet paper shortages.
Worst. Apocalypse. Ever.

You know those car commercials where there’s only one vehicle on the road – doesn’t seem so unrealistic these days …

They can open things up next month, I’m staying in until July to see what happens to you all first.

Day 37:  The garbage man placed an AA flyer on my recycling bin.

The spread of Covid-19 is based on two things:
1. How dense the population is.
2. How dense the population is.

Appropriate analogy: “The curve is flattening so we can start lifting restrictions now” In other words…”The parachute has slowed our rate of descent, so we can take it off now”.

People keep asking: “Is coronavirus REALLY all that serious?”  Listen y’all, the churches and casinos are closed.  When heaven and hell agree on the same thing it’s probably pretty serious.

Never in a million years could I have imagined I would go up to a bank teller wearing a mask and ask for money.

Home School Day 1:  I’m trying to figure out how I can get this kid transferred out of my class.

Putting a drink in each room of my house today and calling it a pub crawl.

Okay, the schools are closed.  So, do we drop the kids off at the teacher’s house or what?

For the second part of this quarantine do we have to stay with the same family, or will they relocate us?  Asking for myself …

Coronavirus has turned us all into dogs.  We wander around the house looking for food.  We get told “No” if we get too close to strangers and we get really excited about going for walks and car rides.

The dumbest thing I’ve ever bought was a 2020 planner …

I was in a long line at 7:45 am today at the grocery store that opened at 8:00 for seniors only.  A young man came from the parking lot and tried to cut in at the front of the line, but an old lady beat him back into the parking lot with her cane. He returned and tried to cut in again, but an old man punched him in the gut, then kicked him to the ground and rolled him away. As he approached the line for the 3rd time he said, “If you don’t let me unlock the door, you’ll never get in there.”

Enjoy your day…You don’t have anything else to do.

Finding Perspective In These Difficult Times

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The Corona Virus has brought the world to a virtual standstill. The things that people once enjoyed doing and the places they loved to travel has all come to an abrupt halt. The virus has affected the lifestyle of every individual and family. It’s a mess out there now. It can sometimes be hard to discern between what’s a real threat and what is just simple panic and hysteria.

Consider this; did any of us think, just a few short months ago, that we would all be required to wear masks, keep a six-foot distance between each other, be told not to touch, shake hands, or even hug each other for fear of spreading this dastardly virus? Did you ever fathom the thought that businesses, gyms, theaters, salons, eateries, and other establishments would be closed and millions upon millions would be out of work? And who ever heard of the term, “social distancing?”

The current environment has also affected people psychologically in various ways Some people have used the time of quarantine in positive ways: spending more quality with their families, spending more time in prayer and Scripture reading, enjoying the quietness of life. Unfortunately, this time has had the opposite effect on individuals: rise in depression, abuse and other negative effects. A current study showed that nearly half (45%) of adults in the United States reported that their mental health has been negatively impacted due to worry and stress over the virus.

Let’s put this whole period of time into perspective. So far, this pandemic has only been with us for about three months and, for some people, it seems like a lifetime. But let’s take a moment and put this into perspective.

Imagine for a moment, that you were born in the year 1900. (right around the time period that your grand, great-grand parents were born).

On your 14th birthday, World War I begins, then ends on your 18th birthday four years later. 22 million people perish in that war.

Later in the year, a Spanish Flu epidemic hits the planet and runs until your 20th birthday. 50 million people die from it during those two years with 500 million people infected.

Yes, 50 million perished!

On your 29th birthday, the Great Depression begins. Unemployment hits 25%, the World GDP drops 27%. That runs until you are 33.

The country nearly collapses along with the world economy.

When you turn 39, World War II starts, and you aren’t even over the hill yet!

On your 41st birthday, the United States is fully pulled into WWII.

Between your 39th and 45th birthday, 75 million people perish in the war.

At 50, the Korean War starts. 5 million perish. At 55 the Vietnam War begins and doesn’t end for 20 years. 4 million people perish in that conflict.

On your 62nd birthday you have the Cuban Missile Crisis, a tipping point in the Cold War. Life on our planet, as we know it, should have ended. Great leaders prevented that from happening.

When you turn 75, the Vietnam War finally ends.

Think of everyone on the planet born in 1900. How did they survive all of that?

Think about all of those things that you would have experienced in your lifetime. When your grandparents speak about, “when times were hard,” now you have an idea what life was like from their perspective!

Yet they survived through everything listed above.

What we are experiencing right now has been for a FEW MONTHS.

Perspective is an amazing art. We become refined, wiser, and more enlightened as time marches on. Let’s try and keep things in perspective and remember, the God, the maker of the heavens and the earth knows exactly what is going on in the world around us. We don’t need to fear the unknown for He will take care of us. He will keep us safe, free from harm, and watch over us every day!

“The Lord will keep you from all harm. He will watch over your life; the Lord will watch over your coming and going both now and forevermore.” ~ Psalm 212:7-8

When Tomorrow Starts Without Me

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Life and death. The two most basic components of every living person and thing on earth. It was once said that the two most certain things in life are death and taxes. Each one of us will pass on from this world someday and we all probably know of someone who has left us.

Unfortunately, there are times when our loved ones leave us suddenly. We never had the chance to say good-bye and share our final thoughts with them.

I came across the following poem in a paper a few years ago and decided to share with it with you today. I hope that it may bring you a measure of peace and comfort…or please feel free to share it with someone who you may think need it.

When Tomorrow Starts Without Me

When tomorrow starts without me,

Please try to understand,

That an angel came and called my name,

And took me by the hand

 

The angel said my place was ready,

In Heaven far above,

And that I’d have to leave behind

All those I dearly love.

 

But when I walked through Heaven’s Gates,

I felt so much at home,

For God looked down, smiled at me,

And told me “Welcome Home.”

 

So, when tomorrow starts without me,

Don’t think we’re far apart,

For every time you think of me,

I’m right there in your heart.

 

~ Author Unknown

We Are Not All in the Same Boat

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Over the course of the past few months, the CORONAVIRUS has had far reaching effects felt around the world. Millions of people have experienced a variety conditions and situations in not only their personal lives but also with their families and friends. One of the things that we all hear is, “We are all in this together”…and it’s true.

But consider the following…

I heard that we’re all in the same boat but it’s not like that. We were in the same storm but not in the same boat. Your ship can be shipwrecked and mine might not be. Or vice versa

For some, quarantine is optional. A moment of reflection, of re-connection, easy in flip flops, with a cocktail or coffee. For others this is a desperate financial and family crisis.

With the 600% weekly increase in unemployment some are bringing in more money to their households than they were working. Others are working more hours for less money due to pay cuts or loss of sales.

Some families of four just received $3400 from the stimulus while other families of four saw $0.00.

Some were concerned about getting a certain candy for Easter while others were concerned there would be enough bread milk and eggs for the weekend.

Some want to go back to work because they don’t qualify for unemployment and are running out of money. Others want to kill those who break the quarantine.

Some are home spending two to three hours a day helping their child with online schooling while others are spending two to three hours a day to educate their children on top of a 12 hour work day.

Some have experienced the near death of the virus some have already lost someone from it and some are not sure if the loved ones are going to make it. Others don’t believe this is a big deal.

Some have faith in God and expect miracles during this 2020. Others say the worst is yet to come.

So friends we are not in the same boat. We’re going through a tough time when our perceptions and needs are completely different.

Each of us will emerge in our own way from this storm. It is very important to see beyond what is seen at first glance. Not just looking actually seen.

We are all on different ships during this storm experiencing a very different journey.

 

Realize that and be kind!

~ Author: Unknown

Poems of Comfort in Times of Grief

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Simply put…a two poems of comfort for times of grief.

 

The Moment That You Died

The moment that you died

My heart was torn in two

One side filled with heartache

The other died with you.

 

I often lie awake at night

When the world is fast asleep, and

Take a walk down memory lane

With tears upon my cheeks.

 

Remembering you is easy

I do it every day

But missing you is heartache

That never goes away.

 

I hold you tightly within my heart

And there you will remain

Until the joyous day arrives

That we will meet again.

~ Unknown~

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Walking With us Forever

Our lives go on without you

But nothing is the same

We have to hide our heartache

When someone speaks your name.

 

Sad are the hearts that love you

Silent are the tears that fall

Living here without you

Is the hardest part of all.

 

You did so many things for us

Your heart was kind and true

And when we needed someone

We could always count on you.

 

The special years will not return

When we were all together

But with the love in our hearts

You walk with us forever.

~All-greatquotes.com~

A Prayer for the Times

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Photo by Meet Savsani on Unsplash

The world has been brought to a stand-still and millions of people around the world are struggling and need a sense of peace and comfort. This is a prayer that was recently posted by a friend of mine whose friend is a Lutheran pastor. I thought that this supplication would be something worth sharing to people who may need it.

 

May we who are merely inconvenienced remembered those whose lives are at stake.

 

May we who have no risk factors remember those most vulnerable.

 

May we who have the luxury of working from home remember those who must choose between preserving their health or making their rent.

 

May we have the flexibility to care for our children when their schools close remember those who have no options.

 

May we have had to cancel our trips remember those who have no safe place to go.

 

May we who are losing our margin money in the tumult of the economic market remember those who have no margin at all.

 

May we who settle in for a quarantine at home remember those who have no home.

 

During this time, we cannot visually wrap our arms around each other, let us find ways to be the loving embrace of God to our neighbors.

 

Amen.

The Story of the Christmas song, “I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day”

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Photo by Belov7043 on Pexels.com

In March of 1863, 18-year-old Charles Appleton Longfellow walked out of his family’s house on Brattle Street in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and—unbeknownst to his family—boarded a train bound for Washington, D.C., traveling over 400 miles across the eastern seaboard in order to join President Lincoln’s Union army to fight in the Civil War.

Charles (b. June 9, 1844) was the oldest of six children born to Fannie Elizabeth Appleton and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, the celebrated literary critic and poet. Charles had five younger siblings: a brother (aged 17) and three sisters (ages 13, 10, 8—another one had died as an infant).

Less than two years earlier, Charles’s mother Fannie had tragically died after her dress caught on fire. Her husband, awoken from a nap, tried to extinguish the flames as best he could, first with a rug and then his own body, but she had already suffered severe burns. She died the next morning (July 10, 1861), and Henry Longfellow’s facial burns were severe enough that he was unable even to attend his own wife’s funeral. He would grow a beard to hide his burned face and at times feared that he would be sent to an asylum on account of his grief.

When Charley (as he was called) arrived in Washington D.C., he sought to enlist as a private with the 1st Massachusetts Artillery. Captain W. H. McCartney, commander of Battery A, wrote to Henry Wadsworth Longfellow for written permission for Charley to become a soldier. HWL (as his son referred to him) granted the permission.

Longfellow later wrote to his friends Charles Sumner (senator from Massachusetts), John Andrew (governor of Massachusetts), and Edward Dalton (medical inspector of the Sixth Army Corps) to lobby for his son to become an officer. But Charley had already impressed his fellow soldiers and superiors with his skills, and on March 27, 1863, he was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the 1st Massachusetts Cavalry, assigned to Company “G.”

After participating on the fringe of the Battle of Chancellorsville in Virginia (April 30-May 6, 1863), Charley fell ill with typhoid fever and was sent home to recover. He rejoined his unit on August 15, 1863, having missed the Battle of Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863).

While dining at home on December 1, 1863, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow received a telegram that his son had been severely wounded four days earlier. On November 27, 1863, while involved in a skirmish during a battle of the Mine Run Campaign, Charley was shot through the left shoulder, with the bullet exiting under his right shoulder blade. It had traveled across his back and skimmed his spine. Charley avoided being paralyzed by less than an inch.

He was carried into New Hope Church (Orange County, Virginia) and then transported to the Rapidan River. Charley’s father and younger brother, Ernest, immediately set out for Washington, D.C., arriving on December 3. Charley arrived by train on December 5. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was alarmed when informed by the army surgeon that his son’s wound “was very serious” and that “paralysis might ensue.” Three surgeons gave a more favorable report that evening, suggesting a recovery that would require him to be “long in healing,” at least six months.

On Christmas day, 1863, Longfellow—a 57-year-old widowed father of six children, the oldest of which had been nearly paralyzed as his country fought a war against itself—wrote a poem seeking to capture the dynamic and dissonance in his own heart and the world he observes around him. He heard the Christmas bells that December day and the singing of “peace on earth” (Luke 2:14), but he observed the world of injustice and violence that seemed to mock the truthfulness of this optimistic outlook. The theme of listening recurred throughout the poem, eventually leading to a settledness of confident hope even in the midst of bleak despair.

You can hear the song HERE or You can read the whole poem/song below…

“I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day”

I heard the bells on Christmas Day
Their old, familiar carols play,
and wild and sweet
The words repeat
Of peace on earth, good-will to men!

And thought how, as the day had come,
The belfries of all Christendom
Had rolled along
The unbroken song
Of peace on earth, good-will to men!

Till ringing, singing on its way,
The world revolved from night to day,
A voice, a chime,
A chant sublime
Of peace on earth, good-will to men!

Then from each black, accursed mouth
The cannon thundered in the South,
And with the sound
The carols drowned
Of peace on earth, good-will to men!

It was as if an earthquake rent
The hearth-stones of a continent,
And made forlorn
The households born
Of peace on earth, good-will to men!

And in despair I bowed my head;
“There is no peace on earth,” I said;
“For hate is strong,
And mocks the song
Of peace on earth, good-will to men!”

Then pealed the bells more loud and deep:
“God is not dead, nor doth He sleep;
The Wrong shall fail,The Right prevail,
With peace on earth, good-will to men.”

Article Credit: Justin Taylor, “The Christian Coalition”

The Boy Who Changed A Village

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Photo by nicollazzi xiong on Pexels.com

We all have struggles and burdens that we deal with on a daily basis. For untold thousands of people, they can carry hardships, misery, and a sense of doom with them for years.

Today, I would like to share the following story from a blogger friend of mine, Chuck L., author of a fabulous site, “Dr.JoyFinder.com” I think that you will enjoy his “Bits of Wisdom,” art, and other ways of finding joy.

The Boy Who Saved A Village

Once upon a time in a small mountain village, it was the custom for the villagers to strap on their knapsacks each morning. Then, during the day, each time they worried about something or felt depressed about a problem, they would pick up a small pebble and put it in their knapsack. The knapsacks were heavy and a burden to carry because the villagers never emptied them. They carried their burdens every day.  It was all they knew.

One day one of the village elders walked down to the river bank bent over from his knapsack full of burdens and noticed one of the small boys from the village skipping pebbles across the water. The boy’s knapsack was empty.

“What are you doing?” the old man asked. “And why is your knapsack empty? Why aren’t you carrying your burdens like the rest of us?”

“I come down to the river bank at the end of each day,” the boy said, “and skip my pebbles across the water until my knapsack is empty. I see no reason to keep carrying them.”

The old man was stunned and so bent over from his knapsack full of burdens that he could hardly move. He had never seen anyone cast their burdens away like that.

“Would you like to try it?” the boy asked.

The old man was hesitant, yet it seemed like such a good idea.  Slowly he reached into his knapsack that was large and heavy from all the burdens he had accumulated over many years. He grabbed a pebble and studied it, recalling the burden of pain that he felt when he had placed it in his knapsack.  He was so bent over that it was difficult to cast the burden away and watch it skip across the water and finally disappear, but he somehow did it.

The boy smiled.

The old man smiled also.  It was easier than he thought to let go of the burden. Then he tossed another pebble, another burden, then another, and another.  The boy stayed and watched.  They built a fire and the old man kept throwing until his knapsack was at last empty. He felt so relieved.

The next day the old man, standing straight and tall, told the other villagers what happened and how good he felt.  They could see how happy he was, how he looked and acted like a different person. They were amazed.

At the end of the day, all the villagers joined the old man and the small boy and went to the river bank and skipped their burdens across the water until their knapsacks were empty. They were amazed at how good and happy they felt.  They never continued to hang onto their burdens again.

A sign was erected at the entrance to the village that said, “IT’S HARD TO BE ON TOP OF THE WORLD WHEN YOU’RE CARRYING IT ON YOUR SHOULDERS. LET GO AND LIVE.”