Overcoming Dyslexia: The Whoopi Goldberg Story

There are millions and millions of people around the world who have been born with some type of emotional, mental, or physical problems.

In order to become successful in life, the most important thing that will determine if a person overcomes their condition and become a successful individual, is their determination, hard work, and positive mind set to lead productive lives.

Today’s story is a tale about a very successful and famous actress who had to deal with the terrible condition of dyslexia. Find out how she focused her desire and aspirations to become the person that she is today.

It is hope and desire that this article will somehow inspire you today!

Whoopi Goldberg was born in New York City in 1955, as Caryn Johnson. She spent the first years of her life in a public housing project in Manhattan. Over the course of a turbulent early life, she survived poverty, drug addiction, single motherhood and a stint on welfare to become one of America’s most beloved entertainers.

Whoopi also struggled with dyslexia and, as a result, dropped out of high school. “I knew I wasn’t stupid, and I knew I wasn’t dumb. My mother told me that. Everybody told me I wasn’t stupid or dumb. If you read to me, I could tell you everything that you read. They didn’t know what it was. They knew I wasn’t lazy, but what was it?” When she was an adult, she finally found the reason for her reading struggles – dyslexia. As Whoopi once recounted, “I learned from a guy who was running a program and he had written a sentence on a board. And I said to him, ‘You know, I can’t read that.’ And he said, ‘Why not?’ And I said, ‘Because it doesn’t make any sense to me.’ So he said, ‘Well, whatever you see, write exactly what you see underneath.’ And so, he brought me to letters by coordinating what I saw to something called an A, or a B, or a C, or a D, and that was pretty cool.”

She said it still takes effort, but time and hard work has made it easier for her to read.

Source: values.com

700 Followers!!!!

Photo Credit: quiltville.blogspot.com

Photo Credit: quiltville.blogspot.com

Unbelievable! I just found out that my web site has now over 700 followers!! I would like to thank each one of you for your decision to be a follower of “Good Time Stories.” I am truly humbled and thankful. I never thought that I would EVER have any where near 700 people that would lie my page. It is my hope that I can be a continue to serve as many people that I can to bring happiness and joy to their life each day  🙂

The Giggle of the Week

Good Marriage Advice

There was a couple that had never fought in 25 years. A friend asked the husband: “How did you make that possible?”

The husband responded by saying, “We went to Shimla for our honeymoon. While horseback riding, my wife’s horse jumped and my wife fell off. She got up and patted the horse and said ‘this is your first time’.

After a while it happened again and she said ‘this is your second time’.

When it happened the third time, she took out a gun and shot the horse.

The husband shouted at her saying, “you psycho! You killed the horse!”

She gave the husband a grave look and said “this is your first time.”

And the husband said “and we have lived happily since then!”

The Old, Ugly Fisherman

Photo Credit: EoinGardiner via Flickr

Photo Credit: EoinGardiner via Flickr

I think that it is really a sad thing how often people falsely judge others based purely on their looks without first knowing what their heart and soul are REALLY like.  I Read the following story on atimetolaugh.org that gives us a great example of what it is like when we treat the unfortunately with dignity, respect and love.

Our house was directly across the street from the clinic Entrance Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. We lived downstairs and rented the upstairs rooms to out patients at the clinic. One summer evening as I was fixing supper, there was a knock at the door. I opened it to see a truly awful looking man.

“Why, he’s hardly taller than my eight-year-old,” I thought as I stared at the stooped, shriveled body. But the appalling thing was his face–lopsided from swelling, red and raw. Yet his voice was pleasant as he said, “Good evening. I’ve come to see if you’ve a room for just one night. I came for a treatment this morning from the eastern shore, and there’s no bus ’til morning.”

He told me he’d been hunting for a room since noon but with no
success, no one seemed to have a room. “I guess it’s my face…I know it looks terrible, but my doctor says with a few more treatments…”

For a moment I hesitated, but his next words convinced me: “I could sleep in this rocking chair on the porch. My bus leaves early in the morning.” I told him we would find him a bed, but to rest on the porch.

I went inside and finished getting supper. When we were ready, I asked the old man if he would join us “No thank you. I have plenty.” And he held up a brown paper bag. When I had finished the dishes, I went out on the porch to talk with him a few minutes.

It didn’t take a long time to see that this old man had an oversized heart crowded into that tiny body. He told me he fished for a living to support his daughter, her five children, and her husband, who was hopelessly crippled from a back injury.

He didn’t tell it by way of complaint; in fact, every other sentence was prefaced with a thanks to God for a blessing. He was grateful that no pain accompanied his disease, which was apparently a form of skin cancer. He thanked God for giving him the strength to keep going.

At bedtime, we put a camp cot in the children’s room for him.   When I got up in the morning, the bed linens were neatly folded and the little man was out on the porch. He refused breakfast, but just before he left for his bus, haltingly, as if asking a great favor, he said, “Could I please come back and stay the next time I have a treatment? I won’t put you out a bit. I can sleep fine in a chair.”

He paused a moment and then added, “Your children made me feel at home. Grownups are bothered by my face, but children don’t
seem to mind.” I told him he was welcome to come again.

On his next trip he arrived a little after seven in the morning. As a gift, he brought a big fish and a quart of the largest oysters I had ever seen. He said he had shucked them that morning before he left so that they’d be nice and fresh. I knew his bus left at 4:00 a.m. and I wondered what time he had to get up in order to do this for us.

In the years he came to stay overnight with us there was never a time that he did not bring us fish or oysters or vegetables from his garden. Other times we received packages in the mail, always by special delivery; fish and oysters packed in a box of fresh young
spinach or kale, every leaf carefully washed.

Knowing that he must walk three miles to mail these, and knowing how little money he had made the gifts doubly precious. When I received these little remembrances, I often thought of a comment our next-door neighbor made after he left that first morning. “Did you keep that awful looking man last night? I turned him away! You can lose roomers by putting up such people!”

Maybe we did lose roomers once or twice. But oh! If only they could have known him, perhaps their illnesses would have been easier to bear. I know our family always will be grateful to have known him; from him we learned what it was to accept the bad without complaint and the good with gratitude to God.

Recently I was visiting a friend who has a greenhouse. As she showed me her flowers, we came to the most beautiful one of all, a golden chrysanthemum, bursting with blooms. But to my great surprise, it was growing in an old dented, rusty bucket. I thought to myself, “If this were my plant, I’d put it in the loveliest container I had!” My friend changed my mind.

“I ran short of pots,” she explained, “and knowing how beautiful this one would be, I thought it wouldn’t mind starting out in this old pail. It’s just for a little while, till I can put it out in the garden.”

She must have wondered why I laughed so delightedly, but I was imagining just such a scene in heaven. “Here’s an especially beautiful one,” God might have said when he came to the soul of the sweet old fisherman.  “He won’t mind starting in this small body.”

How Will You Be Remembered?

Photo Credit: Sean MacEntee via Flickr

Photo Credit: Sean MacEntee via Flickr

I have often wondered what other people would remember or think of me when my time on earth has come to an end. What would be my legacy? How would I be remembered? I found the following story fascinating because it shows us that sometimes, if we are given a “second chance”, we can turn our lives around for the good.

About a hundred years ago, a man looked at the morning newspaper and to his surprise and horror, read his name in the obituary column. The newspapers had reported the death of the wrong person by mistake. His first response was shock. Am I here or there? When he regained his composure, his second thought was to find out what people had said about him. The obituary read, “Dynamite King Dies.” And also “He was the merchant of death.” This man was the inventor of dynamite and when he read the words “merchant of death,” he asked himself a question, “Is this how I am going to be remembered?” He got in touch with his feelings and decided that this was not the way he wanted to be remembered. From that day on, he started working toward peace. His name was Alfred Nobel and he is remembered today by the great Nobel Prize.

Just as Alfred Nobel got in touch with his feelings and redefined his values, we should step back and do the same.

What is your legacy?

How would you like to be remembered?

Will you be spoken well of?

Will you be remembered with love and respect?

Will you be missed?

It makes you think…..

——————-

Source:  great-motivational-stories.blogspot.com

A Lion’s Tale: A Story About Courage and Bullies

Photo Credit: Foxtongue via Flickr

Photo Credit: Foxtongue via Flickr

There are many times throughout a person’s life that they may be bullied, abused or harassed by a person or group of people. Probably one of the most important things that can help a person deal with this kind of behavior is their mental and emotional mind-set.  A brave attitude is one of the best remedies for abuse and harassment.

In a small village there lived a boy called Leo. He was a small, slim kid, and he lived forever in fear because some boys from a neighboring village would harass poor Leo and try to have fun at his expense.

One day, a young wizard was passing by the village and saw Leo being made fun of. When the other boys left, the wizard went over to Leo and gave him a beautiful lion’s tail, along with a small tie that allowed Leo to hang the lion’s tail from his belt.

-“It’s a magic tail. When the person wearing it acts bravely, he or she will turn into a ferocious lion.”

Having seen the young wizard’s powers some days earlier during his act, Leo didn’t doubt his words, and from that time on he wore the lion’s tail hanging from his belt, hoping that the horrible kids would turn up so he could teach them a good lesson.

But when the boys came along, Leo was scared and he tried to run away. However, they soon caught him up and surrounded him. The usual jokes and pushing started, then Leo felt the lion’s tail hanging from his belt. Then, summoning up all his courage, Leo tensed his body, made two fists, and looked up, fixedly into the eyes of each of the boys, and with all the calmness and ferocity in the World, he promised that if they didn’t leave him alone at that instant one of them – even if it were only one – would regret it forever… today, tomorrow, and any other day. He kept looking them in the eye, with his hardest expression, ready to do what he had promised.

Leo felt goose bumps all over. This must be the sign that he was turning into a lion, because the looks on the boys’ faces were definitely changing. They all took a step back, looked at each other, and finally ran off. Leo wanted to take off after them and give them a good beating with his new body, but when he tried to move, he felt his legs were short and just normal, so he had to abandon the idea.

Not far off, the wizard observed, smiling. He ran over to Leo. Leo was very happy, though a bit disappointed that his new lion body had lasted only a short time, and he hadn’t managed to fight them.

-“You wouldn’t have been able to anyway,” the wizard told him,

“no one fights with lions, because simply from seeing them, and knowing how brave and ferocious they are, everyone runs away. Have you ever seen a lion fighting?”

It was true. Leo couldn’t remember ever having seen a lion fighting. Leo became filled with thought, looking at the lion’s tail. And he understood everything. There had been no magic, no transformation, no nothing. What happened was that a good friend had shown him that bullies and other cowardly animals never dare to confront a truly brave boy.

 

 

Author: Pedro Pablo Sacristán via freestoriesforkids.com

A Giggle For the Week

An Indian walks into a cafe with a shotgun in one hand and pulling a male buffalo with the other. He says to the waiter:
“Want coffee.”
The waiter says, “Sure, Chief. Coming right up.”
He gets the Indian a tall mug of coffee . . .
The Indian drinks the coffee down in one gulp, turns and blasts the buffalo with the shotgun, causing parts of the animal to splatter everywhere and then just walks out.

The next morning the Indian returns.He has his shotgun in one hand, pulling another male buffalo with the other.
He walks up to the counter and says to the waiter:
“Want coffee.”
The waiter says, “Whoa, Tonto!
We’re still cleaning up your mess from yesterday. What was all that about, anyway?”
The Indian smiles and proudly says,
“Training for a position in United States Congress . . . Come in, drink coffee, shoot the bull, leave mess for others to clean up, disappear for rest of day.”